The AntiThesis to Fast Fashion

The Antithesis to Fast Fashion

In recent years, the emergence and success of new fast-fashion brands has influenced a change to consumers spending habits. Whilst previously, followers of trends had to wait for seasons to changes before being able to purchase the trends, certain brands have met the demands of the “now” generation by producing pieces almost instantly. 

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A recent example of this trend, is the 21st birthday of the youngest member of the Kardashian clan - Kylie Jenner. Whilst the event was taking place, Instagram was saturated with images of the garments that adorned the celebrity guests, tabloids were live posting the images and reviews on Twitter from fashionistas were uploaded. Whilst this was happening, fast fashion brand, Fashion Nova, had their minions working away to recreate the pieces, which were then available on their website as the Kardashian’s slept off their hangovers. 

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Whilst the availability and price makes fast fashion a very appealing market to buy into, there is consistently a compromise. Specifically with regard to quality and feel, and items often become throw-away after one night out. Sustainably and environmentally, this throw-away culture cannot possibly be a good thing, and in light of this, the consumer is starting to invest more for longevity, rather then having to constantly replace their ever growing wardrobe. Due to this, there has been a rise in an alternative trend and businesses – Designer restorative studios.

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Almost an antithesis to fast fashion, whereby the consumer is encouraged to rummage to the back of their wardrobe and pull out their valuable, once loved pieces – that may have seen their day. These pieces can be taken to the restoritive clinics, where they will restore and beautify the items, to bring them back to their former life. 

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It takes between 25 and 40 years for leather to decompose – depending on the mix of materials used, and due to the recent coverage in the media, we know that manmade items such as plastic, polyester and viscose, take a whole lot more time. Therefore, having your old items restored is definitely a benefit for the environment. Surely, taking your old, worn-out Balenciaga trainers through a restorative procedure, is better than them sitting in a landfill being chewed at by all forms of animals?